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Lost over Laos : a true story of tragedy, mystery, and friendship / Richard Pyle, Horst Faas ; foreword by David Halberstam.

Pyle, Richard (Author). Faas, Horst. (Added Author).
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Available copies

  • 1 of 1 copy available at Evergreen Indiana.

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0 current holds with 1 total copy.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Morgan Co PL - Martinsville Main Library 959.7043 PYL (Text) 78551000262448 Non-Fiction Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 0306811960
  • Physical Description: xxiv, 276 pages, 48 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps, portraits ; 24 cm
  • Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Da Capo Press, [2003]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages [244]-247) and index.
Subject: Burrows, Larry.
Huet, Henri, 1927-1971.
Potter, Kent, 1947-1971.
Shimamoto, Keisaburō, 1937-1971.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975 > Personal narratives, American.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975 > Journalists.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975 > Press coverage.
War photographers > Laos > Biography.
Photojournalists > Biography.
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  • Baker & Taylor
    Relates the circumstances behind the deaths of four combat photographers in 1971 when their helicopter was shot down over Laos, and the efforts to locate the crash site and the photographers' remains twenty-seven years later.
  • Baker & Taylor
    A powerful, beautifully illustrated chronicle describes the search for the helicopter crash site that claimed the lives of four combat photographers in 1971 over Laos. 50,000 first printing.
  • Blackwell North Amer
    In 1971, as American forces hastened their withdrawal from Vietnam, the U.S.-backed Saigon regime launched a bold attack into Laos, hoping to cut North Vietnam's supply line, the fabled Ho Chi Minh Trail. Three days into the risky operation called Lam Son 719, a helicopter was hit by enemy fire and exploded in a fireball, killing four top combat photographers - Larry Burrows of Life magazine, Henri Huet of the Associated Press, Kent Potter of United Press International, and Keisaburo Shimamoto of Newsweek.
    The Saigon press corps and the American public were stunned, but the remoteness of the location made a recovery attempt impossible. When the war ended four years later in a communist victory, the war zone was sealed off to outsiders and the helicopter incident faded from most memories. Yet two journalists - Richard Pyle and Horst Faas, the authors of this book - never forgot their friends and colleagues who were on that helicopter.
    At long last, twenty-seven years after the crash, the authors returned to Laos and joined a U.S. MIA-search team excavating the hillside where the helicopter crashed. Despite the rugged and rain-washed terrain, the team unearthed camera parts and bits of film providing eerie proof of what happened there.
    The narrative of Lost over Laos is framed in a period that was among the war's bloodiest for both the military and the media. It is rich with behind-the-scenes anecdotes about the Saigon press corps and illustrated with stunning work by the four combat photographers who died.
  • Perseus Publishing
    In 1971, as American forces hastened their withdrawal from Vietnam, a helicopter was hit by enemy fire over Laos and exploded in a fireball, killing four top combat photographers, Larry Burrows of Life magazine, Henri Huet of Associated Press, Kent Potter of United Press International, and Keisaburo Shimamoto of Newsweek. The Saigon press corps and the American public were stunned, but the remoteness of the location made a recovery attempt impossible. When the war ended four years later in a communist victory, the war zone was sealed off to outsiders, and the helicopter incident faded from most memories. Yet two journalists from the Vietnam press corps- Richard Pyle, former Saigon Bureau Chief, and Horst Faas, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer in Vietnam-pledged to return some day to Laos, resolve mysteries about the crash, and pay homage to their lost friends. True to their vow, twenty-seven years after the incident the authors joined a U.S. team excavating the hillside where the helicopter crashed. Few human remains were found, but camera parts and bits of film provided eerie proof of what happened there.The narrative of Lost Over Laos is framed in a period that was among the war's bloodiest, for both the military and the media, yet has received relatively little attention from historians. It is rich with behind-the-scenes anecdotes about the Saigon press corps and illustrated with stunning work by the four combat photographers who died and their colleagues.
  • Perseus Publishing
    The richly illustrated story of four combat photographers who died in a fiery helicopter over Laos in 1971-and the search, twenty-seven years later, for the crash site.

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