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  • 1 of 1 copy available at Evergreen Indiana.

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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Indiana State Library - Indianapolis [Mss I] ISLI S1873 (Text) 00000106662844 Manuscripts Available -

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  • Physical Description: 0.01 Cubic feet

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General Note: Processing Information: Collection processing completed 2015/09/10 by Bethany Fiechter. EAD finding aid created 2015/09/10 by Bethany Fiechter.
Helen Keller letter, Rare Books and Manuscripts, Indiana State Library
Legal title, copyright, and literary rights reside with Rare Books and Manuscripts, Indiana State Library, Indianapolis, IN. All requests to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted to Rare Books and Manuscripts.
At the age of nineteen months, due to an attack of scarlet fever, Helen Keller lost her senses of sight and hearing. Helen's parents requested that a teacher from the Perkins Institution in Boston, Massachusetts, be sent to instruct the child soon thereafter. Miss Anne M. Sullivan was sent to Helen's home in Tuscumbia, Alabama, to train her according to the methods of Dr. S. G. Howe. From 1888 onwards, at the Perkins Institution, and under Miss Sarah Fuller at the Horace Mann School in New York, she not only learned to read, write, and talk, but became proficient to some degree in the ordinary education curriculum, several languages, and mathematics. Unfortunately, no exact record of the steps of her education was kept. In 1900, Miss Keller entered Radcliffe College where, with the aid of tutors and special proctors (and, of course, her friend and teacher Anne Sullivan Macy, who remained with her throughout), Helen graduated cum laude in 1904. After her college education, Miss Keller began working extensively in causes for the blind all over the world. She made many tours and held fund-raising benefits for the American Foundation for the Blind. During and after World War II she was untiring in her efforts to aid blinded veterans, orphans, and refugees. Various honors, awards, and honorary degrees and citations were conferred upon Miss Keller by foreign governments and civic, educational, and welfare organizations throughout the U.S. Helen Keller represents one of the most remarkable cases to date of a person who overcame natural disabilities to develop knowledge and an exceptionally wide general culture. Her writings include: Optimism (1903), "The Song of the Stone Wall" (1910), Helen Keller's Journal (1938), Teacher (1955), and others.Source:Papers of Helen Keller, 1880-1968, Finding Aid, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, 1972.http://oasis.lib.harvard.edu/oasis/deliver/~sch00288
This collection was received by Rare Books and Manuscripts as a donation.
No further additions are expected.
Restrictions on Access Note:
This collection is open for research.
Summary, etc.: This collection includes one, signed letter to Mrs. Morgan from Helen Keller, stamped "Camp Sheridan Free Library, (American Library Association)" the date is unknown.The letter reads: "To Mrs. Morgan, with grateful and happy memories. Helen Keller"
Preferred Citation of Described Materials Note:
Helen Keller letter, Rare Books and Manuscripts, Indiana State Library
Terms Governing Use and Reproduction Note:
Legal title, copyright, and literary rights reside with Rare Books and Manuscripts, Indiana State Library, Indianapolis, IN. All requests to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted to Rare Books and Manuscripts.
Biographical or Historical Data:
At the age of nineteen months, due to an attack of scarlet fever, Helen Keller lost her senses of sight and hearing. Helen's parents requested that a teacher from the Perkins Institution in Boston, Massachusetts, be sent to instruct the child soon thereafter. Miss Anne M. Sullivan was sent to Helen's home in Tuscumbia, Alabama, to train her according to the methods of Dr. S. G. Howe. From 1888 onwards, at the Perkins Institution, and under Miss Sarah Fuller at the Horace Mann School in New York, she not only learned to read, write, and talk, but became proficient to some degree in the ordinary education curriculum, several languages, and mathematics. Unfortunately, no exact record of the steps of her education was kept. In 1900, Miss Keller entered Radcliffe College where, with the aid of tutors and special proctors (and, of course, her friend and teacher Anne Sullivan Macy, who remained with her throughout), Helen graduated cum laude in 1904. After her college education, Miss Keller began working extensively in causes for the blind all over the world. She made many tours and held fund-raising benefits for the American Foundation for the Blind. During and after World War II she was untiring in her efforts to aid blinded veterans, orphans, and refugees. Various honors, awards, and honorary degrees and citations were conferred upon Miss Keller by foreign governments and civic, educational, and welfare organizations throughout the U.S. Helen Keller represents one of the most remarkable cases to date of a person who overcame natural disabilities to develop knowledge and an exceptionally wide general culture. Her writings include: Optimism (1903), "The Song of the Stone Wall" (1910), Helen Keller's Journal (1938), Teacher (1955), and others.Source:Papers of Helen Keller, 1880-1968, Finding Aid, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University, 1972.http://oasis.lib.harvard.edu/oasis/deliver/~sch00288
Ownership and Custodial History:
This collection was received by Rare Books and Manuscripts as a donation.
Accumulation and Frequency of Use Note:
No further additions are expected.
Subject: American Library Association.
Deafblind people
Genre: Correspondence.
Search Results Showing Item 4 of 208

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