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The devil's defender : my odyssey through American criminal justice from Ted Bundy to the Kandahar massacre / John Henry Browne.

Browne, John Henry, 1946- author. (Author).
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Available copies

  • 3 of 4 copies available at Evergreen Indiana.

Current holds

1 current hold with 4 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Greenwood Public Library - Greenwood 340.092 BRO (Text) 36626103759478 New Adult Nonfiction Available -
Mooresville Public Library - Mooresville 340.092 BRO (Text) 37323005272094 NONFIC Available -
Perry County Public Library - Tell City 340.09 BRO (Text) 70621000211669 Adult - New Available -
Plainfield-Guilford Township Public Library 340.092 Browne (Text) 31208912300037 new non-fiction Checked out 12/23/2016

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781613734872
  • ISBN: 1613734875
  • Physical Description: 248 pages ; 24 cm
  • Publisher: Chicago, Illinois : Chicago Review Press Incorporated, 2016.

Content descriptions

General Note: Includes index.
Formatted Contents Note: The Ted murders -- "Where did you get those shoes?" -- The shadows of secret cities -- "Are you experienced?" -- The Spiro Agnew acid test -- Deborah -- A total eclipse of the sun -- Chicago -- I go to prison -- The killer beside me -- Escape -- A bargain -- Confessions -- Success -- The floor is supposed to be green? -- Defending Benjamin Ng -- I want a new drug -- Fighting for women who fight back -- The execution of Theodore Bundy -- Presumed guilty -- The barefoot bandit -- A massacre in Kandahar.
Summary, etc.: In the tradition of bestselling legal memoirs from Johnnie Cochran, F. Lee Bailey, Gerry Spence, and Alan Dershowitz, John Henry Browne’s memoir, The Devil’s Defender, recounts his tortuous education in what it means to be an advocate—and a human being. For the last four decades, the Seattled-based criminal defense lawyer has defended the indefensible. From Facebook folk hero “the Barefoot Bandit” Colton Harris-Moore, to Benjamin Ng of the Wah Mee massacre, to Kandahar massacre culprit Sgt. Robert Bales, Brown has stood at the forefront of our national debate over the death penalty, putting on trail our most base and violent instincts—and the institutional deficiencies that let our most vulnerable fall through the cracks. His unceasing advocacy and the daring to take on some of the most unwinnable cases—and nearly win them all—has led 48 Hours’ Peter Van Sant to call him “the most famous lawyer in America.” But although the Browne that America has come to know cuts a dashing and confident figure, he has forever been haunted by his job as counsel to Ted Bundy, the most famous serial killer in American history. A formerly drug- and alcohol-addicted (yet wildly successful) defense attorney who could never let go of the case that started it all, Browne here traces the roots of his discontent as well as his dedication, asking himself the question others have asked him all along: Does defending evil make you evil, too?
Subject: Browne, John Henry, 1946- author.
Lawyers > United States > Biography.

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