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Midwest maize : how corn shaped the U.S. heartland / Cynthia Clampitt.

Clampitt, Cynthia, uuthor. (Author).
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Available copies

  • 2 of 2 copies available at Evergreen Indiana.

Current holds

0 current holds with 2 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Batesville Memorial Public Library - Batesville 633.1 CLAMPITT (Text) 34706001474503 Non-Fiction 600-699 Available -
Hussey-Mayfield Memorial Branch 633.15 CLAMPITT (Text) 33946003082661 Nonfiction . 2nd Floor Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780252038914
  • ISBN: 0252038916
  • ISBN: 9780252080579
  • ISBN: 0252080572
  • Physical Description: xii, 288 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [2015]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (pages 267-274) and index.
Formatted Contents Note: From Oaxaca to the world, or how maize became corn -- Out of one, many: the unity and diversity of corn -- Birth of the Midwest and the corn belt -- Cities, transportation, and booming business -- Sow, hoe, harvest -- From field to table -- Hooves, feathers, and invisible corn -- Popcorn: America's snack -- Transformations -- Embracing change- and questioning change -- Celebrating corn -- Living with corn: early 1800s to early 1900s -- Living with corn: early 1900s to present -- Eating corn: recipes and histories -- Questions, issues, and hopes for the future.
Summary, etc.: Food historian Cynthia Clampitt pens the epic story of what happened when Mesoamerican farmers bred a nondescript grass into a staff of life so prolific, so protean, that it represents nothing less than one of humankind's greatest achievements. Blending history with reportage, she traces the disparate threads that have woven corn into the fabric of our diet, politics, economy, science, and cuisine. At the same time she explores its future as a source of energy and the foundation of seemingly limitless green technologies. The result is a bourbon-to-biofuels portrait of the astonishing plant that sustains the world.
Subject: Corn > Middle West.
Corn > Middle West > History.

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