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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Adams PL Sys. - Decatur Branch FIC FOLLETT PIL (Text) 34207000120080 Adult Fiction Available -
Adams PL Sys. - Decatur Branch FPB FOL PIL (Text) 34207001412791 Adult Fiction PB Available -
Adams PL Sys. - Geneva Branch FIC FOLLETT PIL (Text) 36880000114028 Adult Fiction Available -
Attica PL - Attica F FOL (Text) 74231000028027 Adult Fiction Available -
Barton Rees Pogue Mem. PL - Upland F FOL (Text) 76277000014207 Fiction Available -
Benton Co PL - Fowler F FOL (Text) 34044000129435 Adult Fiction Available -
Bloomfield Eastern Greene Co PL - Bloomfield Main FIC FOL (Text) 36803000850045 FICTION Available -
Bloomfield Eastern Greene Co PL - Eastern Branch FIC FOL (Text) 36804000174170 FICTION Available -
Brookston Prairie Twp PL - Brookston FIC FOL (Text) 38209000137789 Fiction Available -
Butler PL - Butler FIC FOLLET Pillars 1 (Text) 73174000000851 Adult: Fiction Available -
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Record details

  • ISBN: 0688046592
  • ISBN: 9780688046590
  • ISBN: 0451225244
  • ISBN: 9780451225245
  • ISBN: 0451207149
  • ISBN: 9780451207142
  • Physical Description: 973 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Edition: 1st ed.
  • Publisher: New York : Morrow, [1989]

Content descriptions

General Note:
Series numeration from author's website.
Series numeration from goodreads.com.
Summary, etc.:
Set in twelfth-century England, this epic of kings and peasants juxtaposes the building of a magnificent church with the violence and treachery that often characterized the Middle Ages.
Subject: Great Britain > History > Stephen, 1135-1154 > Fiction.
Cathedrals > Design and construction > Fiction.
Genre: Historical fiction.
Epic fiction.
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The Pillars of the Earth


By Ken Follett

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2008 Ken Follett
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780688046590

Chapter One

In a broad valley, at the foot of a sloping hillside, beside a clear bubbling stream, Tom was building a house.

The walls were already three feet high and rising fast. The two masons Tom had engaged were working steadily in the sunshine, their trowels going scrape, slap and then tap, tap while their laborer sweated under the weight of the big stone blocks. Tom's son Alfred was mixing mortar, counting aloud as he scooped sand onto a board. There was also a carpenter, working at the bench beside Tom, carefully shaping a length of beech wood with an adz.

Alfred was fourteen years old, and tall like Tom. Tom was a head higher than most men, and Alfred was only a couple of inches less, and still growing. They looked alike, too: both had light-brown hair and greenish eyes with brown flecks. People said they were a handsome pair. The main difference between them was that Tom had a curly brown beard, whereas Alfred had only a fine blond fluff. The hair on Alfred's head had been that color once, Tom remembered fondly. Now that Alfred was becoming a man, Tom wished he would take a more intelligent interest in his work, for he had a lot to learn if he was to be a mason like his father; but so far Alfred remained bored and baffled by the principles of building.

When the house was finished it would be the most luxurious home for miles around. The ground floor would be a spacious undercroft, for storage, with a curved vault for a ceiling, so that it would not catch fire. The hail, where people actually lived, would be above, reached by an outside staircase, its height making it hard to attack and easy to defend. Against the hail wall there would be a chimney, to take away the smoke of the fire. This was a radical innovation: Tom had only ever seen one house with a chimney, but it had struck him as such a good idea that he was determined to copy it. At one end of the house, over the hall, there would be a small bedroom, for that was what earls' daughters demanded nowadays—they were too fine to sleep in the hall with the men and the serving wenches and the hunting dogs. The kitchen would be a separate building, for every kitchen caught fire sooner or later, and there was nothing for it but to build them far away from everything else and put up with lukewarm food.

Tom was making the doorway of the house. The doorposts would be rounded to look like columns—a touch of distinction for the noble newlyweds who were to live here. With his eye on the shaped wooden template he was using as a guide, Tom set his iron chisel obliquely against the stone and tapped it gently with the big wooden hammer. A small shower of fragments fell away from the surface, leaving the shape a little rounder. He did it again. Smooth enough for a cathedral.

He had worked on a cathedral once—Exeter. At first he had treated it like any other job. He had been angry and resentful when the master builder had warned him that his work was not quite up to standard: he knew himself to be rather more careful than the average mason. But then he realized that the walls of a cathedral had to be not just good, but perfect. This was because the cathedral was for God, and also because the building was so big that the slightest lean in the walls, the merest variation from the absolutely true and level, could weaken the structure fatally. Tom's resentment turned to fascination. The combination of a hugely ambitious building with merciless attention to the smallest detail opened Tom's eyes to the wonder of his craft. He learned from the Exeter master about the importance of proportion, the symbolism of various numbers, and the almost magical formulas for working out the correct width of a wall or the angle of a step in a spiral staircase. Such things captivated him. He was surprised to learn that many masons found them incomprehensible.

After a while Tom had become the master builder's right-hand man, and that was when he began to see the master's shortcomings. The man was a great craftsman and an incompetent organizer. He was completely baffled by the problems of obtaining the right quantity of stone to keep pace with the masons, making sure that the blacksmith made enough of the right tools, burning lime and carting sand for the mortar makers, felling trees for the carpenters, and getting enough money from the cathedral chapter to pay for everything.

If Tom had stayed at Exeter until the master builder died, he might have become master himself; but the chapter ran out of money—partly because of the master's mismanagement—and the craftsmen had to move on, looking for work elsewhere. Tom had been offered the post of builder to the Exeter castellan, repairing and improving the city's fortifications. It would have been a lifetime job, barring accidents. But Tom had turned it down, for he wanted to build another cathedral.

His wife, Agnes, had never understood that decision. They might have had a good stone house, and servants, and their own stables, and meat on the table every dinnertime; and she had never forgiven Tom for turning down the opportunity. She could not comprehend the irresistible attraction of building a cathedral: the absorbing complexity of organization, the intellectual challenge of the calculations, the sheer size of the walls, and the breathtaking beauty and grandeur of the finished building. Once he had tasted that wine, Tom was never satisfied with anything less.

That had been ten years ago. Since then they had never stayed anywhere for very long. He would design a new chapter house for a monastery, work for a year or two on a castle, or build a town house for a rich merchant; but as soon as he had some money saved he would leave, with his wife and children, and take to the road, looking for another cathedral.



Continues...

Excerpted from The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett Copyright © 2008 by Ken Follett. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
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