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The Geography of nowhere : the rise and decline of America's man-made landscape

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  • 2 of 2 copies available at Evergreen Indiana.

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0 current holds with 2 total copies.

Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Carnegie PL of Steuben Co - Angola 720.47 KUN (Text) 33118000106070 Adult: Nonfiction Available -
Plainfield-Guilford Twp PL - Plainfield 720.47 Kunstler (Text) 31208912219625 non-fiction Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 0671888250
  • ISBN: 9780671888251
  • Physical Description: print
    303 pages ; 22 cm
  • Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, 1993

Content descriptions

General Note: "A Touchstone book.".
Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Summary, etc.: The Geography of Nowhere traces America's evolution from a nation of Main Streets and coherent communities to a land where every place is like no place in particular, where the cities are dead zones and the countryside is a wasteland of cartoon architecture and parking lots. In elegant and often hilarious prose, Kunstler depicts our nation's evolution from the Pilgrim settlements to the modern auto suburb in all its ghastliness. The Geography of Nowhere tallies up the huge economic, social, and spiritual costs that America is paying for its car-crazed lifestyle. It is also a wake-up call for citizens to reinvent the places where we live and work, to build communities that are once again worthy of our affection. Kunstler proposes that by reviving civic art and civic life, we will rediscover public virtue and a new vision of the common good. "The future will require us to build better places," Kunstler says, "or the future will belong to other people in other societies."
Subject: Suburbs United States Planning
Architecture Environmental aspects United States
Architecture and society United States
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